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They Want To Implement A Global System Of Digital Identification “For All”

It doesn’t take a genius to figure out where this could be heading. For a moment, I would like for you to imagine a rather chilling “fictional” scenario.



Not too far in the future, all “global citizens” are required to possess proper “digital identification” or else they will not be permitted to access the new global digital financial system. Central banks all over the globe have rolled out their new “central bank digital currencies”, but in order to use those currencies you must “prove that you are who you say you are”, and the only way to do that is with the new global system of digital identification that has been introduced. As cash is phased out, those that resist being part of the new global system are increasingly pushed to the outer fringes of society. Hardly anyone is willing to employ them any longer, it has become virtually impossible for them to get loans, and they are looked down upon by much of the general population. And then after the vast majority of the global population has “willingly” signed up for the new global system of digital identification, it is announced that the system will now become mandatory. That means that anyone that does not submit will not be able to buy, sell, get a job or have a bank account.


You may think that I am exaggerating the dangers of a global system of digital identification.

I wish that I was.


Once a global system of digital identification is introduced, it will rapidly become our most important form of identification.


It will become more important than your driver’s license and more important than your Social Security number.


Pretty quickly, it would become required for almost every financial transaction that you make online.

A lot of people may think that would be a good thing. After all, there are so many scammers and thieves on the Internet these days.


And I would agree that there is a need for more financial security on the Internet, but I am 100 percent against any type of global digital identification system because the potential for tyranny would be off the charts.


Unfortunately, that is exactly the type of system that is now being proposed by policy makers at the United Nations.


In a May 2023 policy brief entitled “A Global Digital Compact — an Open, Free and Secure Digital Future for All”, we are told that “an open, free, secure and human-centred digital future” is absolutely critical for the “attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals”…

The present brief proposes the development of a Global Digital Compact that would set out principles, objectives and actions for advancing an open, free, secure and human-centred digital future, one that is anchored in universal human rights and that enables the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals. It outlines areas in which the need for multi-stakeholder digital cooperation is urgent and sets out how a Global Digital Compact can help to realize the commitment in the declaration on the commemoration of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the United Nations (General Assembly resolution 75/1) to “shaping a shared vision on digital cooperation” by providing an inclusive global framework. Such a framework is essential for the multi-stakeholder action required to overcome digital, data and innovation divides and to achieve the governance required for a sustainable digital future.

Most people in the general population would not be too alarmed after reading that introductory paragraph.


But as they say, the devil is in the details.


If you go to page 8 of the policy brief, you will find the section where a system of digital identification “linked with bank or mobile money accounts” is proposed…

Digital IDs linked with bank or mobile money accounts can improve the delivery of social protection coverage and serve to better reach eligible beneficiaries. Digital technologies may help to reduce leakage, errors and costs in the design of social protection programmes.

I briefly mentioned this the other day, but I don’t think that most people understood the implications that this has for all of us.


Under such a system, if your social credit score gets too low you could be put in “digital jail” for a certain period of time. Your “digital privileges” would be suspended for a while, and that would mean that you could not buy, sell or live your normal life for the duration of your punishment.


Of course if you insist on being a “repeat offender” enough times, you could have your “digital privileges” revoked permanently.


What would you do then?


You wouldn’t be able to buy or sell anything.


You wouldn’t be able to get a job.


You wouldn’t be able to have a bank account.


At best, you would be a total outcast from society.


Don’t be fooled into thinking that this sort of a system is a long way off.


Three months from now, the European Union will “mandate” that all member states offer a “digital identity wallet” to every single one of their citizens and businesses…

The European Union will mandate digital identity under eIDAS 2.0, which will go into effect in September 2023 and ensure all Member States offer a digital identity wallet (DIW) to citizens and businesses. According to the European Commission, “At least 80% of citizens should be able to use a digital ID solution to access key public services by 2030.”

Initially, participation by individuals and businesses in the EU system will be voluntary.


But over the past few years we have seen how quickly “voluntary” measures can become “mandatory”.


When I say that we are living in one of the most critical times in all of human history, I am not joking.


There is a reason why the UK, the EU and the U.S. are all getting ready to roll out CBDCs.


And there is a reason why “digital identification” has suddenly become such a hot issue.


They really do want to build a digital prison for all of us, and if you plan to object the time to do so is now.

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